Ancient Roman Music

Last updated XXI Januarius 2001.


Attila

Composed by Giuseppe Verdi
Opera about the would-be Hun invader of Rome. Recorded by

Ben-Hur

The soundtrack to the 1959 film based on the book by Lew Wallace is composed by Miklós Rósza. A CD box set is also available.

La Clemenza di Scipione

Composed by Johann Christian Bach
Overture Performed by Hanover Band Conducted by Anthony Halstead

La Clemenza di Tito

Composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Opera about the Emperor Titus. Recorded by

The Fall of the Roman Empire

The soundtrack to the 1964 ( film, based on the book The Decline & Fall of the Roman Empire ( volumes 1-3, volumes 4-6) by Edward Gibbon is composed by Dimitri Tiomkin.

"The Fountains of Rome", – see "The Pines of Rome"

A Funny Thing Happened On The Way To The Forum

Original cast recording of the famous Broadway show by Larry Gelbart, Steven Sondheim et al. Based on Plautus and later a film.

Gladiator

Score of the Golden-Globe-winning film. "The Pines of Rome"
by Ottorino Respighi
Recorded by

Pompeii

by Triumvirat

"Roman Festivals",
see "The Pines of Rome"

Scipione

by Georg Friedrich Handel
Opera about Publius Cornelius Scipio Africanus in Hispania.

Scipione affricano

Composed by Pier Francesco Cavalli

"Il sogno di Scipione", K 126: Liere sono al par del Vento ("The Dream of Scipio")
Composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Recorded by

Spartacus

The soundtrack to the 1960 film (VHS tape widescreen edition, DVD), is based on the book Spartacus by Howard Fast. Also, now out of print is the "Love Theme from Spartacus" by Terry Callier.

Spartacus

by Michael Farmer

Synaulia: Music from Ancient Rome, Vol. 1

Reconstructions of music of Imperial Rome, using original instruments, rebuilt by musician and musicologist, Walter Maioli. Flutes and various wind instruments. Read more about this unique CD at the Early Music site.

Synaulia: Music from Ancient Rome, Vol. 2

Music of the imperial court: exotic banquets, intimate scenes of romance, an ode to the Muse, featuring vocals, flutes and string instruments like the lyre.

Die Toten Augen

by Eugen D'Albert. Banned opera about Romans in Jerusalem. Read a review from the San Francisco Chronicle.

Copyright © 1998-2003 by Richard M. Heli.
Permission granted to reprint so long as this notice is preserved in its entirety and I am informed prior to the re-use. Published since June 1994.
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